Every business is forced to grow in some way, at some time, to be successful. We can help.

Example 1: Staying Competitive
You have a well-established business and have been financially comfortable for many years; you’ve figured out the path to success and and you’ve been sticking to the program. Recently, business has started slowing and you’re seeing your competitors enjoying the success you’re used to. You find yourself wondering… if I haven’t changed, what’s going on?

What would you do?

Example 2: Managing Growth & Culture
Your company has been steadily generating a higher volume of business over the past year. Initially you and your staff were thrilled about the influx of new clients but over the past few months, your staff has become frustrated and more tightly-wound, you can see tension is rising and the once playful mood in the office is changing, but nobody has given you any indication why. You start taking your staff to happy hour once a month, you implement “casual Friday” and you give everyone a small raise, but the culture isn’t changing and you’re so busy doing your own job that you can’t seem to find the time you need to figure this all out. Your three best employees have quit in the last 4 weeks and you’re feeling like you’re treading water just trying to stay afloat with all your new business.

What would you do?

Example 3: Strategic HR Development
You have the next million dollar business idea, you’re sure of it. You hire a friend with a background in business development to start gauging interest and the results confirm you’re on the right path with this idea! You hire another friend, and then another. As you grow, you start hiring employees from internet recruiting sites. All at once, you realize “this is a real company”! You start to second guess yourself – “Am I hiring right people? Am I paying my team fairly? What happens if someone gets hurt at work or tries to sue me?”. You want to do everything right, but you’ve never owned a business before and your degree is in anthropological studies.

What would you do?

Example 4: Consistency and Efficiency
Your business is doing great and six months ago you opened up a long-awaited second location about 45 minutes away. Your employees are great, sales are up and you’re happy; except that you’re starting to see inconsistencies in the way each location is operating. You find yourself trekking back and forth to oversee the operations of both stores and in the process, your work day is getting shorter and your workload is piling up.

What would you do?

A year from now, you will wish you had started today. 
— Karen Lamb